Question 1 of 12: Tearing Down Barriers

President Ronald Reagan once said, “There are no constraints on the human mind, no walls around the human spirit, no barriers to our progress except those we ourselves erect.”

“Willingness to change is a strength, even if it means plunging part of the company into total confusion for a while,” said Jack Welch, past Chairman and CEO of General Electric. His call to action was, “Change before you have to. Control your own destiny or someone else will.”

Are there barriers that need to be torn down in your own workplace? Perhaps between divisions, between departments, or even between individual colleagues?

Find a work or art, or a historical artifact, in the Tower section of the hotel near the Trinity Corridor, that speaks to the remarkable results of tearing down barriers.

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Question 2 of 12: Strength of Purpose, and Pulling Together as a Team

Mahatma Gandhi is quoted as saying, “Strength does not come from physical capacity. It comes from an indomitable will.”

More recently, world-renowned bodybuilder, actor and former Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger said, “Strength does not come from winning. Your struggles develop your strengths. When you go through hardships and decide not to surrender, that is strength.”

Is strength important in the workplace? And what type of strength? Strength of purpose? Of commitment?

And what about focusing your strength as a team? American industrial pioneer Henry Ford said “You will find men who want to be carried on the shoulders of others, who think that the world owes them a living. They don’t seem to see that we must all lift together and pull together.”

Find a work of art in the Tower section of the hotel, near the Chantilly Ballroom, that speaks to the importance of strength and teamwork. Strength of body, strength of purpose, and the incredible potential of focusing great strength in the same direction.

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Question 3 of 12: What Kind of Leader Are You?

Ancient Chinese military strategist and philosopher Sun Tzu is quoted as saying, “A leader leads by example, not by force.”

What type of leader are you? Do people follow your example?

British Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill said, “Dictators ride to and fro upon tigers which they dare not dismount. And the tigers are getting hungry.”

Former American Secretary of State Henry Kissinger said, “The task of the leader is to get his people from where they are to where they have not been.”

Finally, famed Green Bay Packers coach Vince Lombardi said, “Leaders are made, they are not born. They are made by hard effort, which is the price which all of us must pay to achieve any goal that is worthwhile.”

Find a work of art or a historic artifact in the Tower section of the hotel, in the Trinity Art Corridor  that speaks of a certain type of leadership.  Then ask yourself, am I am fair and principled leader, or do I dictate to others?  Am I a leader to be followed because of the example I set, or do I lead based on fear and domination?

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Question 4 of 12: Office Gossip and Pettiness

American humorist Will Rogers is quoted as saying, “Live in such a way that you would not be ashamed to sell your parrot to the town gossip.”

There is an old Spanish proverb that states “Whoever will gossip to you will gossip about you.”

Does office gossip create an unhealthy work environment? Do you experience it in your workplace? What can be done to control or stop it?

Famed swashbuckling movie star Errol Flynn was quoted as saying, “It isn’t what they say about you. It’s what they whisper.”

And Chinese philosopher Confucius said, “What is whispered in a man’s ear is sometimes heard 100 miles away.”

Locate a piece of artwork in the Tower Section of the hotel, near the exit for the fire pit, that speaks (literally) about petty gossip.

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Question 5 of 12: Fire Up Your Passion

Tony Robbins says, “Passion is the genesis of genius.”

Is there passion to succeed in your company or in your workplace?

Former Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir said, “Make the most of yourself by fanning the tiny, inner sparks of possibility into flames of achievement.”

Do you come to work with those sparks of possibility waiting to become flames?

German physician and philosopher Albert Schweitzer says, “Sometimes our light goes out, but is blown into flame by another human being. Each of us owes deepest thanks to those who have rekindled this light.”

Find a piece of art just outside the main doors to the hotel’s Atrium entrance that speaks to you about these flames of life.

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Question 6 of 12: Are We Having Fun Yet?

President Franklin D. Roosevelt once said, “Happiness lies in the joy of achievement and the thrill of creative effort.”

And American inventor Thomas Edison is quoted as saying, “I never did a day’s work in my life. It was all fun.”

Is it important to have fun in the workplace? Does it make the daily stresses, the long hours, and the deadlines more manageable?

Donald Trump says, “I try to learn from the past, but I plan for the future by focusing exclusively on the present. That’s where the fun is.”

And remember that Walt Disney said, “It’s kind of fun to do the impossible.”

Find a piece of art in the Anatole’s Sculpture Garden, just outside the Verandah Club, that speaks to you about the fun and joy of life.

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Question 7 of 12: Rising From the Depths

Confucius said, “Our greatest glory is not in never falling but rising every time we fall.”

And Helen Keller is quoted as saying, “All the world is full of suffering. It is also full of overcoming.”

Has your organization overcome adversity in the past? Were you able to rise above it and emerge even stronger? Many have.

“Be courageous. I have seen many depressions in business. Always, America has emerged from these stronger and more prosperous. Be brave as your fathers before you. Have faith! Go forward.” – Thomas Edison

Find a historical artifact in the Anatole’s Sculpture Garden, near the west wing of the hotel, that evokes the spirit of rising from the depths, emerging from adversity and growing even stronger.

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Question 8 of 12: Are You a Mentor?

“Do not train a child to learn by force or harshness; but direct them to it by what amuses their minds, so that you may be better able to discover with accuracy the peculiar bent of the genius of each.”―Plato

And from the noted comedian, Dick Gregory, “One of things I keep learning is that the secret of being happy is doing things for other people.”

Workplace mentoring not only enriches the recipient, but also the mentor himself, and ultimately the entire organization. Do you take the time to mentor younger or more inexperienced colleagues? Has anyone ever helped you in a similar fashion? Do you pay tribute to them by practicing it yourself?

“A return to first principles in a republic is sometimes caused by the simple virtues of one man. His good example has such an influence that the good men strive to imitate him, and the wicked are ashamed to lead a life so contrary to his example.”—Machiavelli

“A person always doing his or her best becomes a natural leader, just by example.”—Joe DiMaggio

Locate a piece of art in the Anatole Sculpture Garden near the koi pond that speaks to the importance of mentoring others.

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Question 9 of 12: How Can We Stand Out from the Rest?

Walden author Henry David Thoreau says, “If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away.”

And from Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, “A lot of companies have chosen to downsize, and maybe that was the right thing for them. We chose a different path. Our belief was that if we kept putting great products in front of customers, they would continue to open their wallets.”

How does a company or organization stand out from its competition? How does your organization differentiate itself?

Fashion icon Coco Chanel is quoted as saying, “In order to be irreplaceable one must always be different.”

“The only thing we know about the future is that it will be different.”—Peter Drucker, American management consultant

Find a piece of art in the Tower section, within the Trinity Art Corridor, that speaks to being different, or standing out in a crowd.

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Question 10 of 12: The Importance of Creativity

“Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them.”—Albert Einstein

“Every act of creation is first of all an act of destruction.”—Pablo Picasso

Does your workplace foster or stifle creative thinking? Are you bound by iron-clad rules or is free thinking encouraged?

“Capital isn’t so important in business. Experience isn’t so important. You can get both these things. What is important is ideas. If you have ideas, you have the main asset you need, and there isn’t any limit to what you can do with your business and your life.”— Harvey Firestone, founder of Firestone Tire and Rubber Co.

And legendary American poet Robert Frost comically says, “The brain is a wonderful organ; it starts the moment you get up in the morning and does not stop until you get to the office.”

Locate a piece of art in the Tower section of the hotel, near the Children’s Corner retail store, that speaks to you about individual creativity.

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Question 11 of 12: Protect Your Market Share

“There is only one boss. The customer. And he can fire everybody in the company from the chairman on down, simply by spending his money somewhere else.”—Sam Walton

And from Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, “We don’t have a monopoly. We have market share. There’s a difference.”

Are you doing everything you can to protect your market share? Do you know your competition inside and out? Are you clear on what differentiates you from them?

“It is so much easier to be nice, to be respectful, to put yourself in your customers’ shoes and try to understand how you might help them before they ask for help, than it is to try to mend a broken customer relationship.”—Mark Cuban, American business magnate

“Your most unhappy customers are your greatest source of learning”—Bill Gates

Locate two matching art pieces near the hotel’s Chantilly entrance that speak to you about the importance of protecting what is valuable.

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Question 12 of 12: Innovation and Coordinated Movement

“We keep moving forward, opening new doors, and doing new things because we’re curious, and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths.”—Walt Disney

Everyone has seen distinguished businesses rise and fall. When companies allow themselves to stagnate, to not evolve with the times, or to ignore innovation and diversification, those businesses are destined to perish.

“All mankind is divided into three classes: those that are immovable, those that are movable, and those that move.”—Benjamin Franklin

Companies are a complex choreography of many moving parts, all designed to move the business forward. Without coordinated movement, the business cannot sustain itself.

“Growth, in some curious way, I suspect, depends on being always in motion just a little bit, one way or another.”—Norman Mailer

Locate a remarkable piece of artwork in the middle of Atrium II that speaks to you about the wonders of coordinated movement, and the incredible results attained from well-choreographed, purposeful motion.

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